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80 autonomous robotaxis crashed, according to GM’s Cruise

Many experts predict that self-driving, driverless autonomous cars will play a significant role in transportation in the future. However, a sizable segment of the populace may not be prepared to fully rely on artificial intelligence (AI) to transport them securely to their destination. Particularly when businesses like General Motors are forced to recall their robotaxi fleets after public incidents, as has recently occurred with Cruise’s Chevy Bolt EVs.

The reason why businesses like Waymo and Motional are establishing test markets in densely populated areas like San Francisco and Las Vegas is because there is a lack of confidence in autonomous cars. These businesses want to gather data, but they also want to convince safety authorities that autonomous “robotaxis” can be used safely on a large scale.

But it seems that one of the top manufacturers of driverless vehicles has just experienced a major setback. GM’s Cruise autonomous driving company recently revealed that it was recalling 80 of its self-driving Chevrolet Bolt EV cars for a software upgrade after an incident in San Francisco that left two people wounded, according to a Reuters article.

The algorithms used by Cruise, according to regulators, would “incorrectly forecast” the route of an approaching car. NHTSA noted that under some conditions, “when performing an unprotected left, may cause the (autonomous driving system) to inaccurately forecast the route of another vehicle or be inadequately reactive to the rapid path change of a road user.”

According to Cruise, the vehicle’s software malfunction prompted it to brake forcefully during an unprotected left turn that it believed was essential to prevent a front-end collision.

In essence, Cruise said, the car “had to choose between two possible risk scenarios and picked the one with the least possibility for a major crash at the moment, before the incoming vehicle’s rapid change of course.”

The autonomous driving company also took care to take notice of the police record for the collision, which indicated that the other vehicle, which was moving at 40 mph in a 25 mph zone, was “primarily at blame” for the mishap.

Following the collision, according to Cruise, the company temporarily banned unprotected left turns in its autonomous cars and restricted the operating area. Cruise said it “gradually reintroduced” unprotected left turns on its cars after the recall and the software upgrade.

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257 Comments

  1. Technology go so far in the world by few years now robotics will be employed instead of human being let us try to upgrade our skills.

  2. According to Cruise, the vehicle’s software malfunction prompted it to brake forcefully during an unprotected left turn that it believed was essential to prevent a front-end collision.

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